Leeds Migration Reseach Network

Seminars

Sadler Series Seminar – Refugees, Austerity and Class Racism

Sadler Series Seminar

Refugees, Austerity and Class Racism

gholamSpeaker: Dr Gholam Khiabany

sadler-series-seminar

Date: 30th November 2016 Location-Leeds Humanities Research Institute

In recent times sections of British press and political establishment have described refugees with reference to ‘toxic waste, human flotsam, an unstoppable flood and a terrorist threat’. Refugees are invariably accused of “seeking a better life, wanting to come to Britain because Britain has got jobs, it’s got a growing economy, it’s an incredible place to live” (David Cameron); as well as posing a threat to the EU’s standard of living and social structure (Phillip Hammond). During the EU Referendum the dominant media narrative revolved around a nation under siege by large number of illegal and legal immigrants who receive preferential treatment, strain social services, are the cause of unemployment and poverty, and threaten the very fabric of society. Examining some of the examples in which the economic crisis are blamed on migrations and ‘marauding’ refugees, it will be shown that the official response to and coverage of the refugee crisis attempts to a) advance the discourse of austerity as immigration reform; b) use the perceive threats of refugees from developing countries to introduce measures and policies (structural adjustment) that have been imposed on developing nations through IMF and World Bank; c) redefine anti-immigration in a post-racist disguise by introducing anti-immigration and militarisation of borders as austerity policy; d) displace the markers of ‘insecurity’ from the 99% as a whole on to ‘foreigners’ and refugees. It is through this narrative of anti-immigration justified on the basis of austerity that nationalism which is articulated in opposition to class struggle becomes the vehicle through which the concern of ‘native workers’ are articulated.

Gholam Khiabany teaches in the Department of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of Iranian Media: The Paradox of Modernity and co-author of Blogistan, with Annabelle Sreberny. He is an editor of the Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, and is a member of council of management of the Institute of Race Relations.

For more information visit:

http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/20045/leeds_humanities_research_institute/2844/whowhat_ is_a_goodbad_migrant

This entry was posted in Blog, Events, Seminars.

The Frontline of the Migration Crisis

 

The Frontline of the Migration Crisis

Experiences of Syrian Refugees and Community Support in Turkey and Leeds

Speakers:

Yasemin Somuncu Refugee Commission, ‘All Children are Ours’ Association, Turkey

Sawsan Zaza Syrian community in Leeds

22nd November 2016, Tuesday 16.30-18.30
Michael Sadler Building rom SR (LG.19)

*UPCOMING TALK*
30 November (Wednesday, Leeds Humanities Research Institute, Sem Rm 1, 2-4pm)
Invited Speaker / LMRN Sadler Series:
GHOLAM KHIABANY (Goldsmiths College, London) “Refugees, austerity and class racism”

Photo credit www.anahaberim.com

An event organised by Leeds Migration Research Network in collaboration with Leeds Social Science Institute, School of Sociology and Social Policy and CERIC Business School, University of Leeds

 

 

flayer-migration-crisis

This entry was posted in Blog, Events, Seminars.

Launch Event LeedsMRN

Brigete Jones MRN LaunchLaunch Event: Thursday June 9th 4.00-5.30pm, followed by drinks reception

Leeds University Business School, Maurice Keyworth Lecture Theatre

Speaker: Professor Bridget Anderson, Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS), University of Oxford

Title: Parasites and Beasts of Burden: Rethinking the Politics of Migration

Abstract: The situation at the borders of Europe has seen those seeking to enter depicted either as slaves or as animals while Europeans are increasingly described as ‘natives’. That is, while historically the ‘native’ was often imagined as a sub-species of human being directly in contrast with the European, being native has more recently become associated with a claim to rights to belong in contrast to the non-European ‘space invaders’. This paper will discuss the distinction between the (modern day) slave, the (contemporary) native and the animal, beginning from the observation that the kinds of animals that ‘migrants’ are likened to – cockroaches, rats, parasites etc – are not livestock, that is, they are not productive. In this they are unlike ‘beasts of burden’ and livestock that slaves were compared to in the past. Furthermore, not only do these animals lack the capacity to reason, but they lack the capacity to feel and to elicit feeling. I will consider what this reveals about the contemporary politics of immigration in Europe and the survivalist responses to threats to lifestyles.

Bio: Bridget Anderson is Professor of Migration and Citizenship and Research Director at COMPAS. She has a DPhil in Sociology and previous training in Philosophy and Modern Languages. She is the author of Us and Them? The Dangerous Politics of Immigration Controls (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Doing the Dirty Work? The Global Politics of Domestic Labour (Zed Books, 2000). She co-edited Who Needs Migrant Workers? Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policywith Martin Ruhs (Oxford University Press, 2010 and 2012) The Social, Political and Historical Contours of Deportation with Matthew Gibney and Emanuela Paoletti (Springer, 2013), and Migration and Care Labour: Theory, Policy and Politics with Isabel Shutes (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)

Bridget has explored the tension between labour market flexibilities and citizenship rights, and pioneered an understanding of the functions of immigration in key labour market sectors. Her interest in labour demand has meant an engagement with debates about trafficking and modern day slavery, which in turn led to an interest in state enforcement and deportation, and in the ways immigration controls increasingly impact on citizens as well as on migrants. Bridget has worked closely with migrants’ organisations, trades unions and legal practitioners at local, national and international level.

This entry was posted in Events, News, Seminars.

Parasites and Beasts of Burden: Rethinking the Politics of Migration

Launch Event: Thursday June 9th 4.00-5.30pm, followed by drinks reception

Leeds University Business School, Maurice Keyworth Lecture Theatre

Speaker: Professor Bridget Anderson, Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS), University of Oxford

Title: Parasites and Beasts of Burden: Rethinking the Politics of Migration

Abstract: The situation at the borders of Europe has seen those seeking to enter depicted either as slaves or as animals while Europeans are increasingly described as ‘natives’. That is, while historically the ‘native’ was often imagined as a sub-species of human being directly in contrast with the European, being native has more recently become associated with a claim to rights to belong in contrast to the non-European ‘space invaders’. This paper will discuss the distinction between the (modern day) slave, the (contemporary) native and the animal, beginning from the observation that the kinds of animals that ‘migrants’ are likened to – cockroaches, rats, parasites etc – are not livestock, that is, they are not productive. In this they are unlike ‘beasts of burden’ and livestock that slaves were compared to in the past. Furthermore, not only do these animals lack the capacity to reason, but they lack the capacity to feel and to elicit feeling. I will consider what this reveals about the contemporary politics of immigration in Europe and the survivalist responses to threats to lifestyles.

Brigete Jones MRN LaunchBio: Bridget Anderson is Professor of Migration and Citizenship and Research Director at COMPAS. She has a DPhil in Sociology and previous training in Philosophy and Modern Languages. She is the author of Us and Them? The Dangerous Politics of Immigration Controls (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Doing the Dirty Work? The Global Politics of Domestic Labour (Zed Books, 2000). She co-edited Who Needs Migrant Workers? Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policywith Martin Ruhs (Oxford University Press, 2010 and 2012) The Social, Political and Historical Contours of Deportation with Matthew Gibney and Emanuela Paoletti (Springer, 2013), and Migration and Care Labour: Theory, Policy and Politics with Isabel Shutes (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)

Bridget has explored the tension between labour market flexibilities and citizenship rights, and pioneered an understanding of the functions of immigration in key labour market sectors. Her interest in labour demand has meant an engagement with debates about trafficking and modern day slavery, which in turn led to an interest in state enforcement and deportation, and in the ways immigration controls increasingly impact on citizens as well as on migrants. Bridget has worked closely with migrants’ organisations, trades unions and legal practitioners at local, national and international level.

 

This entry was posted in Seminars.

Northern Postcolonial Network

Third Biannual Northern Postcolonial Network Symposium: Asylum, Refuge, Migration

A Joint Event of the University of Manchester and University of Salford MediaCityUK, University of Salford
29 January 2016 (Attendance FREE)

Programme

9.30 Registration and refreshments

10.15 Welcome

10.30-12.00 Postgraduate Roundtable

Chair: Dr Anastasia Valassopoulos (University of Manchester)

  •   Letizia Alterno (University of Manchester), ‘EU Borderland Migration: Lampedusa and the Radical Crisis of the Human Right to Refuge’
  •   Alexandra D’Onofrio (University of Manchester), on rethinking ethnographic practices and representations of the lived experiences of undocumented migrants
  •   Jo Garbutt (University of Salford), on Henry Smith’s legacies for destitute asylum seekers and on semi-fictional narratives as a means for reconnecting with the past
  •   Brenda Garvey (University of Chester), ‘The Long Road to the Sea’, on different perceptions of sub-Saharan migrations to Europe
  •   Kasia Mika (University of Leeds), ‘From “Crisis” to “Crises”: Migration, Citizenship and Statelessness in the Dominican Republic’
  •   Sarah Stewart (University of Edinburgh), ‘The Gardner’s Guide to Asylum: The Fruitful Terrain of Gardening in Asylum Metaphor and Practice’

12.00-13.00 Lunch and Exhibition

Including a multimedia arts exhibition produced in collaboration with Pod Collective, students, lecturers and local refugees and asylum seekers, and poster presentations by postgraduate researchers

13.00-14.30 Community Roundtable

Chair: Dr Jonathan Darling (University of Manchester)

Including representatives from the University of Manchester, University of Salford, Pod Collective, community groups, and contributors to the exhibition

14.30-15.00 Tea / Coffee

15.00-16.30 Academic Roundtable

Chair: Dr Veronica Barnsley (University of Sheffield)
All to speak on forthcoming volume on Refugee Writing:

  •   Dr Sam Durrant (University of Leeds)
  •   Dr David Farrier (University of Edinburgh)
  •   Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge (University of East Anglia)
  •   Dr Benjamin Thomas White (University of Glasgow)
  •   Dr Agnes Woolley (Royal Holloway)

16.30 Closing Remarks, Reading and Wine Reception

Chair: Dr Caroline Magennis (University of Salford)

 Dr Nitasha Kaul, author of Residue (2014)

Please register for the event by emailing the NPN team at northernpoconetwork@gmail.com including your name, relevant affiliations, and dietary requirements.

Northern Postcolonial Network

http://northernpostcolonialnetwork.com

@northernpoco

https://www.facebook.com/northernpostcolonialnetwork

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POLITICAL DEMOGRAPHY SEMINAR

POPULATION MOBILITIES AND NEO-LIBERALISM
An informal discussion group of the Chair in Sociology and Social Theory

In association with the Bauman Institute

MONDAYS 4-6pm (Feb-May), SSP 12-21

“Oublier Marx; oublier Foucault…”: On rethinking political economy for a world of population movements and mobile freedom

After all the naiveties of globalisation theory of the 80s and 90s, and amidst the subsequent gloom of the 2000s and after, theoretical formulations across the critical humanities and social sciences – in both a post-Marxist and Foucauldian mould – seem stuck on a set of inflexible, deterministic pieties about the evils of “neo-liberalism”. It demonstrates a growing inability in critical social theory to think through the continuing paradoxes and dynamics of de-/re-nationalising global capitalism, states/markets/rights/populations/flows beyond national borders, and the unruly, irrepressible and diversifying economic, cultural and political consequences of growing movements/mobilities – and associated population changes such as fertility, ageing and care – worldwide. With, by definition, no time for the f-word in their world view, the “freedom” of moving persons – the consequences of the unruly “fourth freedom” sometimes present, formally or informally, alongside the unholy late-capitalist trinity of “freedom of movement of capital, goods and services” – remains a problematic residual. Typically it is reduced by Marxists and Foucauldians to either a further exploitable factor of production, domination or privilege – whether class based or colonial – and/or to a further symptom of the top down institutionalised production and control of capitalist/colonised bodies and subjectivities.

And yet, people keep moving and populations keep changing—and not only in structurally determined ways. They move and act as persons with rights, agency and/or creative responses to domination/control, and with complicated social trajectories and cultural consequences, that are neither in line with the interests of governmental institutions nor entirely captured for profit by a faceless global capitalism. Not least these kinds of changes reveal the resistant powers of anti-state informality, of everyday innovation, and of spontaneous orderings (economic or communal) – social products normally attributed by Marxists and Foucauldians, as much as neo-classical economists, to the “neo-liberal” market-state.

The exploratory intuition of this seminar is that we might look for answers or at least alternate ways of talking about markets/states/citizenship/culture beyond nationalised capitalist democracies by delving again into the origins of liberal political economy and demographic theory, and by rexamining resources in the anarchist and libertarian traditions for capturing some of the ongoing possibilities and paradoxes of post-national economic and demographic change. After a Part One working through a set of classic left and right alternates to the Marxist tradition, Part Two will read and discuss four recent classics which each offer new resources for fresh thinking in political economy, political demography and, consequentially, political ecology.

Note on readings

I am not an advocate of minute, ecclesiastical style readings of classic texts. Strategic and selective reading is preferable (suggestions will be made). In Part One, I’m rather more interested in what can still be squeezed conceptually and analytically from these well known texts, for the purposes of discussing the above set of contemporary questions. Part Two, I take these five large books as well worth close reading, but also as starting points for wider issues about conceptualising states and markets, mobilities, globalisation, and change/creativity/ innovation/critique in liberal democratic capitalist societies. Marxists, Foucauldians, Postmodernists and Post-structuralists, of course, are welcome to join the discussion!

Adrian Favell, School of Sociology and Social Policy

Organisation of Seminar

On February 1st (4-6pm), I propose a discussion of the theoretical problems raised by my paper, “The fourth freedom: theories of migration and mobilities in ‘neo-liberal’ Europe”, European Journal of Social Theory (2014)

FEB 1 8 15 22 29

MAR 7 14 21

APR 11 18 25

MAY 2,9 16, 23 30

“The Fourth Freedom”: population mobilities beyond the critique of “neo-
liberalism” [led by Adrian Favell] ;
Background reading: Karl Polanyi, The Great Transformation (1944); Jack Goldstone (2012) ‘A theory of political demography’ [+ further references to be suggested]

No meeting this week] Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations
Thomas Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population William Morris, News From Nowhere

Petr Kropotkin, Fields, Factories and Workshops Tomorrow Friedrich Hayek, Individualism and Economic Order
André Gorz, Farewell to the Working Class (Au delà du socialisme)

James C. Scott, Seeing Like A State (1998)
Scott Lash and John Urry, Economies of Signs and Space (1994)
Luc Boltanski and Eva Chiapello, The New Spirit of Capitalism (1999/2007)

Saskia Sassen, Territory, Authority, Rights (2006)
Thomas Piketty, Capital (2013)
Final discussion: on ‘Political ecology’ with ref. to Tim Jackson,
Sustainability Without Growth (2009) and Giacomo D’Alisa, Federico Demaria & Giorgios Kallis et al, Degrowth: A Vocabulary for a New Era (2014)

The Discussion Group is Open to Allcomers. Drop-Ins any week/time always welcome.

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN THE GROUP PLEASE EMAIL…

a.favell@leeds.ac.uk

POPULATION%20MOBILITIES%20SEMINAR

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